IRB EVENTS

IRB (Inflatable Rescue Boat) Racing is often referred to as the ‘motor sports of surf lifesaving’. This high-octane lifesaving sport will see IRB crews from around the world racing against each other to be the first back to shore. All competitors in this discipline share a need for speed, but at it’s core, this discipline is all about the simulation of rescue situations and how the crew members perform.

IRB crews typically include a driver, a crewperson and a patient. The aim of these events is to be the first in line to rescue the patient in the water and deliver them back to shore safely.

To know what happens in the IRB events, see the descriptions below.

IRB Rescue

Teams are comprised of 1 patient, 1 driver, and 1 crew member. The patient is positioned on the seaward side of the designated buoy.

The driver and crew member are on the beach side of the start/finish line, adjacent to their beach position indicators.

On the starter’s signal, the crew launches their IRB, proceeding through the surf to pick-up their patient, round their buoy, and return to shore to finish the event.

IRB Mass Rescue

Teams are comprised of 2 patients, 1 driver, and 1 crew member. The patients are positioned on the seaward side of the designated buoy.

The driver and crew member are on the beach side of the start/finish line, adjacent to their beach position indicators.

On the starter’s signal, the crew launches their IRB, proceeding through the surf to pick-up their 1st patient, round their buoy, and return to shore. Upon reaching the shore the driver exits the boat, as does the crew, then the patient. The driver will proceed up the beach and round the allotted beach turning marker. Whilst the driver is completing this the crew and patient turn the IRB around so that it is facing to sea.

The IRB shall then be relaunched and proceed through the surf to pick up their 2nd patient, round their buoy, and return to shore to finish the event.

IRB Team Rescue

Teams are comprised of 1 patient and 2 crews (1 driver and 1 crew member per crew). The patient is positioned on the seaward side of a designated buoy. Both crews are positioned on the beach side of the start/finish line, adjacent to their beach position indicator.

On the starter’s signal, the first crew launch their IRB and proceed through the surf to the patient. On the inside of the turn as the IRB rounds the buoy, the crew member jumps overboard on the seaward side of the buoy. The driver completes the buoy turn and returns to shore alone.

Meanwhile the crew member of the second crew moves into the water.

The first driver stays in contact and in control of the IRB until the second crew member secures and takes control of the IRB. The first driver runs up the beach and crosses the start/finish line to tag the second driver who proceeds to the IRB.

The second crew re-launch the IRB, proceeding through the surf, to pick-up the patient and the first crew member, round their buoy, and return to shore to finish the event.

IRB Rescue Tube

Teams are comprised of 1 patient, 1 driver, and 1 crew member. Patients are positioned at their respective patient buoys, set approximately 25m on the seaward side of the turning buoys. Crew members are positioned on the beach side of the start/finish line, adjacent to their respective beach position indicators.

On the starter’s signal, competitors launch their IRBs, proceed through the surf and turn around their respective turning buoy. The crew member dons the rescue tube harness.

After the IRB has rounded the turning buoy, the crew member with harness donned and the rescue tube held in a secure grip, enters the water and swims past the turning buoy to their patients.

The crew member secures the rescue tube around the arms of the patient and tows the patient back to the IRB. Once the crew member makes contact with the IRB or driver, he or she may board before the victim. The driver may assist the crew member and/or victim into the IRB. Patients may assist themselves in boarding the IRB.

After the “victim lift” into the IRB has commenced, the driver drives the IRB around the team’s respective turning buoy and returns to shore to fin.

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